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Click here to see a Ruby-throated with a deformed bill.

Click here to go to my Winter Season hummer page
Here are 2 photos taken with my new digital camera (an Olympus Camedia C-700 Ultra Zoom - for details on this camera's capabilities see this page).  .

It was unusual to see 8 or 9 hummers feeding together - some even sitting together on one perch and taking turns to feed from the same port. Perhaps the continuous rain we'd had for several days had something to do with it. The lower photo shows the Selasphorus species that was around for a few days. Thanks to Bob Sargent, President of the Hummer/Bird Study Group, based in Clay, Alabama, USA, it has been identified as an immature male Rufous Hummingbird.
Hummingbirds

This page was last updated on: May 11, 2002

visits since 9/10/01
8 Ruby-throated Hummingbirds feeding peacefully together in the rain on Sept 5th 2001
The immature male Rufous Hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus), showing his beautiful rufous coloration. He visited my feeders Sept 5th -10th, 01. The other 4 are Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. This photo was taken on Sept 9th, through my kitchen window. He didn't stay long each time he came to feed and I wanted to snap him while I had the chance. He never sat on the perches on the feeder, probably because he was new to using feeders.

This Rufous was only around for 6 days, and once the Ruby-throated migration was over, I didn't see any hummingbirds until my first wintering western species hummingbird arrived on Oct. 28th, 2001. It was an immature male Rufous and I had hoped he'd stick around all winter, like his predecessor in the 00-01 season. However, instead I had several different Rufous and Black-chinned Hummingbirds. In March 02, a hummingbird bander came to catch the female Rufous that had been around for several weeks.  A page showing how she was caught and banded is under construction. Please bookmark this site and check back in the future.
Here are 2 photos taken with my new digital camera (an Olympus Camedia C-700 Ultra Zoom - for details on this camera's capabilities see this page).  .

It was unusual to see 8 or 9 hummers feeding together - some even sitting together on one perch and taking turns to feed from the same port. Perhaps the continuous rain we'd had for several days had something to do with it. The lower photo shows the Selasphorus species that was around for a few days. Thanks to Bob Sargent, President of the Hummer/Bird Study Group, based in Clay, Alabama, USA, it has been identified as an immature male Rufous Hummingbird.
Helen Baines - located in south east Texas, near Houston
Click here to see a Ruby-throated with a deformed bill.

Click here to go to my Winter Season hummer page
© Helen Baines 2001
Helen Baines 2001
© Helen Baines 2001